Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the chief cause of death and disability among children and adults from 1 to 44 years of age in the United States, leading to more than two million emergency department visits annually. A brain protein is thought to be the source of long-term cognitive impairments in those who have had seemingly mild, concussion-type head injuries, and a blood test may one day be available to predict such damage. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of...
More

Prenatal smoking shows up in little kids’ blood

This was the finding of a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, MD, and published in the journal Environmental Research. Previous research has already established that the DNA of cord blood from newborns is altered if the mother smokes during pregnancy. The difference is not in the genetic code itself but in the presence of "epigenetic" marks left on the DNA at 26 locations of the genome. Epigenetic markers are molecules that attach to genes and influence the...
More

Blood Pressure Study

A new study finds that at least 16.8 million Americans could potentially benefit from lowering their systolic blood pressure (SBP) to 120 mmHg, much lower than current guidelines of 140 or 150 mmHg. The scientists calculated the potential impact of preliminary results from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) that will be presented in full at the American Heart Association meeting and published online in the New England Journal of Medicine. The initial analysis of SPRINT, r...
More

Researchers creating rapid diagnostic test for blood infections.

BYU is leading a collaborative team that has just kicked off a massive multidisciplinary effort to combat a threat to global health, the rising prevalence of bacteria that can’t be treated by antibiotics. Four BYU professors from three colleges have joined forces on the multi-year, National Institutes of Health-sponsored effort to create a faster diagnostic test for drug-resistant blood infections. As it stands now, diagnostic tests for these types of infections can take up to three days to prod...
More

UCSB researchers create nanoparticles to act like blood platelets

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara have created nanoparticles that resemble blood platelets that can be used to speed up the healing process and create clots faster to decrease blood loss from an injury. They have turned to the human body’s own mechanisms for inspiration in dealing with the necessary and complicated process of coagulation. By creating nanoparticles that mimic the shape, flexibility and surface biology of the body’s own platelets, they are able to accelera...
More

Miniature human kidney grown in a dish.

Miniature human kidneys have been grown in a Petri dish using stem cells as the starting point, report scientists in Australia. The mini-kidneys, measuring up to 1cm, were the equivalent of the developing organ in a 13-week-old foetus. The team say the findings, published in the journal Nature, could lead to new ways of testing drugs and eventually a way of replacing damaged kidneys. Experts said there was still a long way to go. The scientists were mimicking the process that takes place insi...
More

Telomere Changes Predict Cancer

A simple blood test may be able to predict cancer years before a diagnosis. A distinct pattern in the changing length of blood telomeres, the protective end caps on our DNA strands, can predict cancer many years before actual diagnosis, according to a new study from Northwestern Medicine in collaboration with Harvard University. "Understanding this pattern of telomere growth may mean it can be a predictive biomarker for cancer," Dr. Lifang Hou, the lead study author and a professor of prev...
More

Genetic investigation of Blood Pressure Regulation

A new study pinpoints several gene networks closely linked to the regulation of blood pressure. Framingham Heart Study launched a major initiative to identify and study the genes underlying cardiovascular and other chronic diseases in individuals as this research could lead to new treatments and better strategies for disease prevention. The study, which takes a close look at networks of blood pressure-related genes is published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology. More than one bil...
More

Contacts lenses that changes color when sugar levels change in the blood

Smart contact lens, created by a University of Western Ontario professor, help measure blood glucose levels for people with diabetes. An ongoing innovative research of a new Smart Lens by Jin Shang, a professor of biochemical engineering at the University of Western Ontario is a contact lens that changes color when sugar levels change in the blood. Diabetes is a huge and growing problem affecting one in every 19 people on the planet. It is a daily struggle for people with diabetes to keep ...
More