Biomedical imaging at one-thousandth the cost.

MIT researchers have developed a biomedical imaging system that could ultimately replace a $100,000 piece of a lab equipment with components that cost just hundreds of dollars. The system uses a technique called fluorescence lifetime imaging, which has applications in DNA sequencing and cancer diagnosis, among other things. So the new work could have implications for both biological research and clinical practice. “The theme of our work is to take the electronic and optical precision of this big...
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New low-cost printer tracks HIV patients’ health.

Researchers have patented a low-cost device that can easily monitor the health of HIV patients living in low-resource settings. The portable device works by helping clinicians count the number of CD4 cells that are attacked by HIV in the body. HIV is known to decrease the number of CD4 cells an individual has. When CD4 counts are very low, that indicates the patient’s HIV is progressing toward AIDS and a ramp up of medication is necessary. Patients with HIV are encouraged to participate in re...
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Battery-free pacemaker powered by the heart itself

Scientists are developing next-generation battery-free implantable pacemakers that may be powered by an unlikely source, the heart itself. The advancement is based upon a piezoelectric system that converts vibrational energy, created inside the chest by each heartbeat, into electricity to power the pacemaker. "Essentially, we're creating technology that will allow pacemakers to be powered by the very heart that they are regulating," said M Amin Karami, assistant professor of mechanical engineeri...
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New graphene based inks for high-speed manufacturing of printed electronics.

Developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge in collaboration with Cambridge-based Technology Company Novalia, the method allows graphene and other electrically conducting materials to be added to conventional water-based inks and printed using typical commercial equipment. This is the first time that graphene has been used for printing on a large-scale commercial printing press at high speed. A low-cost, high-speed method for printing graphene inks using a conventional roll-to-roll p...
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MIT invents ‘breakthrough’ 3D printer that can print 10 different materials simultaneously

Researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have made a breakthrough in the field of 3D printing, developing a 3D printer prototype that is able to print up to 10 different materials simultaneously onto a single object. Delivering resolution at 40 microns or less than half the width of a human hair, the “MultiFab” system is the first 3-D printer to use 3-D-scanning techniques from machine vision, which offers two key advantages in accuracy and conven...
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GoTenna creates a cell network out of thin air anywhere on Earth

GoTenna is a solution for off-the-grid travelers who need low-cost connectivity for their smartphone which does not rely on satellites. The latest invention by a Brooklyn-based hardware startup, GoTenna has a modified, smartphone app-based approach for staying in touch at a lower cost when cell service is shaky. This requires no satellite connection. Most of us are fully addicted to our smartphones and when we find ourselves without Wifi or data service, our most direct connection to every...
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NASA developed technology aims to save commercial airlines fuel and time

NASA’s latest technology for commercial airlines could save them fuel and time. The space administration's software is called the Traffic Aware Planner. This software helps to reduce fuel consumption, carbon emissions and cut travel times in commercial airlines. This latest technology is loaded on a tablet and will not require any major change to the already established aviation roles of pilots and ground crew, so the technology can be implemented right away. The app works by reading the plan...
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The Reveeco EcoVéa recycling shower

Possibly the world’s most intelligent shower, EcoVéa recycles water within your shower to push the limits of water conservation. The EcoVéa is a revolutionary ecological shower system that provides considerable water and energy savings, whatever the length, flow, or temperature of the shower. You can now enjoy long, comfortable, guilt-free showers. Promising a savings of up to 80% on both water and energy, the Ecovea system recycles water for immediate reuse, letting you shower in a sort of g...
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Harvard Scientists Make Solar Power Production More Efficient

Solar power could be increased tenfold without additional storage in the near future. A team of Harvard scientists and engineers demonstrated a rechargeable battery that could make storing electricity from intermittently available energy sources, like sun and wind which is safe and cost-effective for both residential and commercial use. Much of the nation’s energy policy is premised on the assumption that clean, renewable energy, such as wind and solar power, will require huge quantities o...
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Life-Saving Infant Incubator That Requires No Electricity

A new portable and reusable infant incubator that requires no electricity and minimal costs was invented by Jane Chen and Rajan Patel. These two innovators came up with an innovative infant warmer which is simple, energy-efficient, and cost-effective. Every year 20 million babies are born premature with low birth weight and they struggle to survive because they cannot regulate their body temperature and they don't have enough fat on their tiny bodies to keep warm. The solution is to kee...
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Tenease – A New treatment for Tennis Elbow

A new medical device called Tenease  has been developed by Ranjan Vhadra, a leading orthopedic surgeon for the treatment for tennis elbow.  The disease itself is a chronic condition caused by damage to the fibres of the elbow which lead to weakness and pain. As this is a common condition, it may affect most adults at some stage in their lives. Vibration therapy has proven to be the most effective method for treating tennis elbow and can also help reduce pain by more than 40 percent; however, ...
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New Plant-Based Insulation Created

Plant-based, natural building materials have the potential to boost energy savings for homeowners. Over a three-year period, University of North Texas researchers developed and tested a low-cost process to prepare kenaf, a plant in the hibiscus family that is similar to bamboo, for use as a building material; specifically, kenaf is used to create structured insulated panel building materials. Scientists worldwide are turning to plants as a resource for biodegradable, renewable and environm...
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