Matrix

The MATRIX is a beautifully designed compact black disc about 4 inches in diameter device that allows you to create and download applications for the Internet of Things, giving you a device that can be used in many different ways at once. With fifteen onboard sensors, MATRIX allows for more than thirty-two thousand sensor combinations that let you control the temperature of your home, monitor your small business after-hours, and so much more. The company describes the Matrix as a small but impre...
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Magnetic 3D printing from Northeastern could help newborns

Researchers at Northeastern University are developing patient-specific 3D printed medical devices for newborns. Anything to do with babies tugs at the heartstrings of most anyone, so the idea of patient-specific catheters made to offer greater support to premature newborns is exponentially inspiring. Their innovative designs are different indeed in that they use magnetic fields to mold 3D printed material into customized devices and products. Meant to be more durable, as well as lightweight, Nor...
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Stretchy, origami battery powers Samsung smartwatch

Stretchy batteries inspired by origami could power smartwatches and other wearable electronics. Newly introduced, stretchy origami-style batteries could power the wearable devices of the future, say researchers who have managed to power a Samsung Galaxy Gear 2 with a battery of their own invention. The lithium-ion batteries developed by a team from Arizona State University are capable of stretching to 150 percent of their natural size and of powering existing smartwatches. Scientists wo...
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Turn your body into a touchscreen interface

Skinput, a new technology, listens to the vibrations of your body and turns it into a touching interface. One of the newest invention ideas in interface devices is Skinput which is the product of a collaboration between Carnegie Mellon's Harrison, Desny Tan and Dan Morris of Microsoft Research. Previous attempts at using projected interfaces used motion-tracking to determine where a person taps. Skinput uses a series of sensors to track where a user taps on his arm. It uses a different and no...
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