Illness & Climate Change

A new NOAA study, published in the journal Ecological Modeling, forecasts an increase in ciguatera fish poisoning in the Gulf of Mexico and the U.S. Southeast Atlantic coast with predicted rising global ocean temperatures due to climate change. People can be affected by ciguatera, the most common form of algal-induced seafood poisoning, by eating contaminated tropical marine reef fish such as grouper, snapper and barracuda. Scientists are now predicting that global climate change will ciguatera,...
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An intelligent, in-home garden.

The Grove Ecosystem is an intelligent indoor garden that enables people to grow fresh, flavorful, and healthy food year-round. The ecosystem contains an aquarium, where fish eat food and turn it into waste. Bacteria take that waste and turn it into nitrates, which is a critical fertilizer for plants. A plumbing system pumps the nitrate-enriched water through the plant beds, creating a self-enclosed ecosystem. This symbiosis between fish, plants, and bacteria is called aquaponics. The ecoystems c...
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Fishy feeling

A new study has found that fish have emotions. The study, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, found that zebrafish responded to stress by an increase in body temperature, or what it known as an “emotional fever.” It’s been suggested that such a thing only exists in mammals, birds and reptiles, but the new research proves otherwise. Scientists placed six zebrafish groups in tanks divided by plexiglass into six chambers, each containing water of a different temperature. Each tank w...
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Navy seeks secret of invisibility from fish.

A study released Thursday says that two ocean fish the big-eyed scad and the lookdown have fine-tuned a method of avoiding predators by hiding in light. Elements in their silvery skin render them nearly impossible to see. The Navy funded the study as part of an effort understand how fish do this, and how it could be used to the Navy's advantage. Although the study focused mostly on just two types of fish, the scad and lookdown are members of a family called the Carangidae, a bountiful clan that ...
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Live imaging reveals how wound healing influences cancer

"See-through" larvae of zebrafish reveal how wound healing leads to skin cancer. Genetically modified larvae of zebrafish were studied by the researchers in the United Kingdom and Denmark   to watch the relationship between wound-associated inflammation and melanoma. The cellular events and changes were observed by live imaging with a special confocal laser-scanning microscope. The experiments showed that neutrophils, the protective inflammatory cells of the body's immune system, gets d...
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