Our Bodies, our Microbial Clouds.

We leave a trail of microbes on every surface we touch, from pens and keyboards to door handles and elevator buttons. Everywhere you go, in everything you do, you are surrounded by an aura of microbes. They drift down from your hair when you scratch your head, they fly off your hand when you wave to your friend, and they spew out of your mouth when you talk. Even when you sit around doing nothing, you’re sitting in your own, personal microbial bubble. In addition to leaving our mark on surfaces,...
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Artificial Ebola virus slowed by large fullerene system.

A recent study shows that a large fullerene system can interrupt the infection of an artificial Ebola virus. An infection with Ebola starts when the virus gains access to the cellular DC-SIGN receptor and begins to infect the immune system’s dendritic cells. Thanks to the new, larger molecule comprised of fullerenes that are coated with carbohydrates, scientists can block the receptor and interrupt the infection. This has been tested on an artificial virus model. Researchers attained a remark...
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Microbiomes could hold keys to improving life.

Microbial life forms including viruses, bacteria, and fungi are the most diverse and abundant organisms on earth. They have shaped our evolutionary origins for billions of years and continue to have widespread impact. The UMIC foresees the microbiomes being leveraged through genetic engineering for applications within 10 years. “Microbes are everywhere. Therefore understanding microbiomes, whether they be the ones that live in and on our bodies or the ones in the environment, is essential to ...
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New flu tracker uses Google search data better than Google.

A team of Harvard statisticians has come up with a new way to track the flu virus using Internet search data. The system uses a method that has been used before, tracking searchers for key words and phrases, but has coupled it with additional data to improve its accuracy. The new model, ARGO (AutoRegression with Google search data), was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and was built on Google Flu Trends, which was Google’s flu tracking model that emerged in 200...
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GMO Chickens Could Block Bird Influenza and Prevent Outbreaks

The latest innovative development by Researchers from the University of Edinburgh and the University of Cambridge are genetically modified glow-in-the-dark chickens developed in order to block the bird flu. The genetically modified organism chickens are given a shot of a fluorescent protein. The modified birds contain a protein to differentiate themselves from other chickens. Under ultraviolet light, their beaks and feet emit a haunting green hue. This sets them apart from regular birds To...
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Antiviral compound fully protects monkeys from Ebola

Rhesus monkeys were completely protected from the deadly Ebola virus when treated three days after infection with a compound that blocks the virus's ability to replicate. These encouraging preclinical results suggest the compound, known as GS-5734, should be further developed as a potential treatment, according to research findings to be presented tomorrow at the IDWeek conference. Travis Warren, Ph.D., a principal investigator at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Disease...
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The Aethlon Hemopurifier

A new device that provides the broad-spectrum elimination of infectious viruses from the circulatory system of infected individuals has been invented. Aethlon Medical, Inc. (OTCQB:AEMD), the pioneer in developing targeted therapeutic devices to address infectious diseases and cancer,  announced that the first patient enrolled in the Company's FDA approved feasibility study has completed their full Hemopurifier® treatment protocol without any device-related adverse events. The Aethlon Hemop...
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Killing HIV by targeting its sweet tooth

Scientists have discovered that HIV has a voracious sweet tooth, which may be its Achilles’ heel, reports a new study from Northwestern Medicine and collaborators. After the virus invades an activated immune cell, it craves sugar and nutrients from the cell to replicate and fuel its wild growth throughout the body. Teams from Northwestern University and Vanderbilt University have reportedly discovered a way to block the virus from feasting on the glucose in an infected patient’s bloodstream. ...
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Viruses are Alive

A new analysis supports the hypothesis that viruses are living entities that share a long evolutionary history with cells. The study offers the first reliable method for tracing viral evolution back to a time when neither viruses nor cells existed in the forms recognized today. Until now, viruses have been difficult to classify because of the abundance and diversity of viruses. Less than 4,900 viruses have been identified and sequenced so far, even though scientists estimate there are more th...
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Scientists identify key culprit responsible for dengue virus infections.

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have identified a key culprit responsible for the fluid loss and resulting shock that are the hallmark of severe and potentially fatal dengue virus infections. A team of researchers led by molecular virologist Eva Harris, a UC Berkeley School of Public Health professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology, presented new evidence that the guilty party is a protein secreted by cells infected with the mosquito-borne dengue v...
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Young scientist bags Google science prize for Ebola express detection kit.

Olivia Hallisey of Greenwich, won the top prize for her Ebola test kit in the fifth annual Google Science Fair, which honored nine students aged 13 to 18 from all over the world last week. The Connecticut-based sophomore from Greenwich High School invented the much needed "novel temperature-dependent, rapid, simple and inexpensive Ebola detection platform." It could soon be much easier to diagnose Ebola thanks to this student’s new invention. Aid workers in Ebola-stricken regions could soon b...
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How flu viruses gain the ability to spread

New study reveals the soft palate is a key site for evolution of airborne transmissibility. Researchers from MIT and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) made the surprising finding on Flu virus, while examining the H1N1 flu strain, which caused a 2009 pandemic that killed more than 250,000 people Scientists have discovered that the soft palate which is the soft tissue at the back of the roof of the mouth, plays a key role in viruses’ ability to travel through ...
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Ebola color coded Protection Suit

The Johns Hopkins University’s has developed a new personal protective suit for front-line health care workers in Ebola. The suit uses technology originally designed by Johns Hopkins to keep cancer patients comfortable. This new suit is color coded to show what surfaces are safe to touch when removing it. The suit, intended for use in future Ebola outbreaks like the 2014 epidemic that killed thousands in West Africa, has elements to keep the wearer more comfortable than existing suits, reduce...
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Sugar Preserves Vaccines without Refrigeration

A sugar–glass cartridge can store vaccines without refrigeration. Scientists at Nova Bio-Pharma Technologies and the University of Oxford have developed a new way of preserving vaccines without refrigeration by sealing the vaccine's live viruses inside glass made of sugar. Currently, vaccines need to be stored in a fridge or freezer which means there is a need for electricity supply and refrigeration trucks for distribution as exposure to inappropriate temperatures can reduce the vaccine p...
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Portable water purification device for the ultimate traveler

 Inventor Micheal Pritchard has found a solution for safe drinking water with a handheld water purification device that creates fresh water instantly. The LifeSaver bottle provides refreshing, germ free water anywhere. The bottle itself is designed to be uncomplicated and user friendly. This bottle consists of long lasting cartridges which help remove viruses and bacteria from contaminated water. One just needs to pump the products manually a few times and pristine drinking water will start t...
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Laser Lights and Viruses: Novel Additions to Biosensors

New biosensors use suits of light and virus-filled fibers for accurate and timely detection to improve safety. Researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) are creating a new biosensor that uses laser light and engineered viruses, created with advanced manufacturing techniques, to more accurately detect the smallest amounts possible of biological molecules in our food, water or blood. Health tests conducted for pregnancy and blood sugar involve putting a drop of fluid on a t...
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